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Here you can find all of our Members’ Posts arranged under the post categories. Click on the title to reveal the date and author, to read the introduction and to find the full post.

A History of the Anthropocene in 50 Objects

Poet Nick Drake offers poems of three dark objects that illuminate our world-shifting ways: an emblem of inefficiency, a single-use convenience that will outlast us, and a nightmare taking shape beneath our feet, our streets, our notice, until... ...
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Science historian and writer Sarah Dry offers objects past, present and future that help us investigate clouds and the gap between seeing and feeling. 'What is not revealed often plays more powerfully in the imagination than what is.' ...
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Poet Nancy Campbell chooses a child's bone kayak, a wooden paddle, innovative metal islands: three objects that demonstrate how the past and present elide as our environment changes and how, whatever choices lie ahead, travel is always forward ...
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Curator Veronica Sekules shares three Anthropocene objects that mark the movement from a visionary symbol of eternity, to the hubris of a transitory age and on to a time which will be witnessed by what endures after us. ...
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Writer Nick Hunt traces the years through present, future and past on a path that will not stay forever on any one course; and returns us to a longer view, honouring the power and beauty of natural forms.    ...
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Curator Ruth Garde selects three Anthropocene objects: artworks that evoke a past, present and future, highlighting how Deep Time and 'human time' are implicated in each other, and the imbalances in our relationship with the rest of nature. ...
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Artist Jennifer Leach selects three objects that evoke a past, present and future Anthropocene, and highlights care and nurture as constants across humanity's ages and communities. Her words move from prose to poetry, suggesting a timeline of hope. ...
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Artist Julien Masson explores memory, material transience and meaning in his an intriguing response to our ClimateCultures challenge to share three objects with personal significance and illustrate the past, present and future of the emerging ‘Age of Human’. ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe set Members a challenge: share your choice of three objects with personal significance for you and that say something of the past, present and future of the emerging Anthropocene. Here is his personal contribution. ...
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Art & Eco Activism

Artistic director and performer Paul Michael Henry, who has devised successive UNFIX festivals, discusses his motivation and ambitions for these international gatherings and explorations, ahead of UNFIX 2019 next month. UNFIX: a command form, a verb, an activity. ...
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Artist Ottavia Virzi describes a recent intervention by Art Rise Up, the creative collective bringing art and activism together for environmental protection, in support of the campaign to halt opencast coal mining, using art to engage cultural meaning. ...
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Film-maker James Murray-White captures the energy and inspiration of a busy summer learning, engaging others and sharing their stories, recalling four very different events: a climate visuals workshop, a regenerative activism retreat, a performance and a coastal encounter ...
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Artist and game designer Ken Eklund shows how working with stories offers popular and accessible routes into the past and present of our life with energy, and imagining possible futures as part of the Stories of Change project.  ...
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Artist Scarlet Hall debuts her poem You, familiar -- narrated over photos of clay sculptures used in a Coal Action Network action outside a government department in London, and accompanied by text from fellow CAN activist Isobel Tarr. ...
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Challenges of Creative Engagement

Artist and researcher Iain Biggs shares thoughts on the place of artists, and of creative ensemble practices, in a culture of possessive individualism that must urgently address its chronic failure of imagination in the face of eco-social crisis. ...
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Artist and writer Jennifer Leach recalls the journey from a sharing of darkness at a climate conference for artists and scientists, and the year-long festival she created in its honour, to her new book, Dancing in the Dark. ...
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Artist Rebecca Chesney describes her explorations creating With far-heard whisper, o’er the sea for exhibition in Newlyn this year -- taking inspiration from the town's tidal observatory and its unique role in revealing the UK's rising sea levels. ...
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Writer and artist Jennifer Leach shared some of her stories at Reading's Earth Living Festival. Here, she discusses these questioning tales for a world's ending -- and the relaunch of her Outrider Anthems enterprise as a sanctuary of ...
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Writer Deborah Tomkins chairs Bristol Climate Writers, who meet to critique their poetry, science or nature writing, short stories or novels. She shares their discussion on 'climate grief' and how psychological responses to climate change influence their writing. ...
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Researcher and writer Wallace Heim recently completed 'the sea cannot be depleted', her online project exploring the military exploitation of the Solway Firth. Wallace shares her reflections on the inspiration behind this powerful project and her creative process. ...
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Poet and artist Salli Hipkiss, in the first of two posts, reflects on how she came to understand the urgent challenges of climate change, and decided to write The Riddle of the Trees, a novel supporting positive change. ...
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Artist Julien Masson describes a residency in the New Forest, an environment that juxtaposes natural and human worlds, and his choice of a physical paint medium to represent the digital realm that often distances us from the natural. ...
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Writer Justina Hart concludes her account of writing Doggerland Rising, researching the prehistory of the mesolithic peoples of these lowland plains before sea level rise created the North Sea, and reveals what she has learned from the process. ...
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Artistic Director Adam Ledger discusses the process of devising The Bone Ensemble's Where's My Igloo Gone? and the challenges of making participatory theatre about home and community that presents climate change as something that we can collectively address. ...
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Writer Justina Hart introduces her poem (commissioned following a Weatherfronts climate change conference) about prehistoric events that drowned Doggerland and made Britain an island, and how her research with the help of palaeo-scientists fed into the creative process. ...
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Composer and pianist Lola Perrin discusses isolation: to create, we need to be alone (physically or mentally) and this can be an unpleasant process. And yet, we carry on creating because suppressing that creativity is even more unpleasant. ...
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Conversations

Writer and editor Sally Moss works with nonviolence education organisation Commonweal, and she suggested an interview for their blog. Sally's questions were a great opportunity to touch on some of the deep connections between climate change and violence. ...
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In a three-way discussion, James Murray-White, Lola Perrin and Paul Allen explore Paul's experiences at the COP23 climate talks in Bonn. Their video interview is a valuable insight for those of us who couldn't be there in person. ...
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Creative Works

Photographer Oliver Raymond-Barker uses an innovative take on the camera obscura to uncover visible and invisible networks and complex histories embedded in a Scottish peninsula whose water-and-landscape is home to nuclear arsenals, peace activists and pilgrims' spiritual traditions. ...
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Writer and photographer Mike Hembury read Deborah Tomkins’ post on how grief and hope feature in the work of fellow 'climate writers', and shares a poem in response to his own research into these experiences under climate change. ...
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Poet Clare Crossman follows the first six of her illustrated poems on nature and climate change with the second of two selections from In the Blackthorn Time and other poems, her collaboration with artist Victor Ibanez, including Naturalist. ...
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Poet Clare Crossman created a sequence of illustrated poems on nature and climate change for an appearance at Pivotal Festival in 2016. Here, she offers a short introduction and the first half dozen, including In the Blackthorn Time. ...
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Writer and artist Salli Hipkiss shares an extract from her novel's manuscript -- a glimpse into the heart of the story and its forest, and further into the development of character, meaning and writing for the 'We Generation'. ...
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Artist Jennifer Leach shares another story she performed as part of Festival of the Dark's micro-festival Dazzle. It's a tale of transformation: stretching imagination, shifting vision as key to waking us up. What if the world were other? ...
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Artist Jennifer Leach shares a story about bees, honey, hexagons and robotics. What the Bee Sees is the first of two stories Jennifer performed at the Festival of the Dark's micro-festival Dazzle. What if the world were other? ...
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Cultural Change

Climate change dramatist Julia Marques looks to her recent experience directing a play about environmental crisis to ask how community and other positive features of amateur dramatics groups might offer us routes into addressing the climate emergency itself. ...
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Environmental artist Laura Donkers follows her initial post on eco-social art engagement with her experience as Visiting Doctoral Researcher, moving to Aotearoa New Zealand from July to November 2018 to expand her research by exploring Kaupapa Māori approaches. ...
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Environmental artist Laura Donkers works with the embodied knowledge of communities, through a form of eco-social art engagement, to help develop climate literacy. Laura describes her approach and experience with local communities in Uist in Scotland's Outer Hebrides. ...
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Royal Court Executive Producer Lucy Davies -- a participant in Creative Climate Leadership training in 2017 -- explores Artists' Climate Lab, a special week of creative activities she and others devised for artists working in London's leading theatres. ...
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Anthropologist Lisa Lucero researches the emergence and demise of political power, ritual and water management among the Classic Maya. Her most recent project explores collapsed groundwater sinkholes for evidence of ancient Maya offerings and climate and landscape histories.    ...
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Composer and pianist Lola Perrin offers this roundup of her own and many others' experiences of ClimateKeys -- the major, global initiative she set up to bring together musicians, experts and audiences to engage in climate change conversations. ...
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Paul Allen, Project Director of the Centre for Alternative Technology's Zero Carbon Britain programme, shares his reflections after taking part in the COP23 climate talks in Bonn, and looks ahead to the cultural challenges for COP24 next year. ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe returns to Anticipatory history, looking at four entries in that book and at other illustrations of how language reveals and shapes the way we understand and respond to erosion and other examples of change. ...
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Photographer Oliver Raymond-Barker shares a talk he gave at art.earth's In Other Tongues, encountering on a climb in a Welsh slate quarry a world beyond our normal modes of communication and a route away from modern separatist language. ...
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Writer Mark Goldthorpe explores an online ecolinguistics course, delving into how we structure and receive discourses -- texts, dialogues, advertising, news reports, stories -- in ways that shape our attitudes and beliefs on environmental, social and economic issues. ...
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Dramatist Julia Marques introduces her research on the increasing interest in climate change within new drama, using visual discourse analysis to chart how the topics are addressed explicitly or form a backdrop to the world of the performance. ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe explores climate change through the lens of 'Wicked Problems' and what 'culture' -- a web of identities and practices that rub up against each other -- means for how we might think about it. ...
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Endangered Worlds

Writer and photographer Mike Hembury spent a week on an Inner Hebridean sailing trip as part of Sail Britain's multidisciplinary Coastline Project. He recalls this small group's ecological encounters and shares poems and photographs they inspired in him. ...
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Poet Nancy Campbell, whose experience in the Arctic was enriched by learning Kalaallisut, reports on the UK tour of The Polar Tombola, which aims to encourage awareness of endangered Arctic languages and the environment recorded in their vocabularies. ...
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Environmental Change

Artist Jo Dacombe explores sense of place, layers of history and the power of objects. Jo describes her work with museums and researchers on visual art inspired by relationships between bones and landscapes, now and into the future. ...
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Visual artist Mary Eighteen updates us on work that imagines a world where the ocean is on the trajectory to extinction. Here, Mary focuses on concepts of 'framing' as a means to provide the visual encounter with abjection.   ...
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Visual artist Rebecca Chesney, whose location-specific work is informed by her research and conversations with scientists, describes her experiences of drought and tree death in California while on a residency and shares some of the images she produced. ...
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Environmental artist Linda Gordon responds to Anticipatory history with reflections on personal memories, intimations of change -- 'places and objects within them become part of our personal inner world' -- and a recent example of her ephemeral art.  ...
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Environmental artist Linda Gordon reflects on a recent exhibition she contributed work to, where artists responded to the documentary 'A Plastic Ocean', and the issues of plastics pollution of the oceans that produced such a diversity of art. ...
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Filmmakers Sarah Thomas and Jon Randall share a conversation about the ideas, stories and creative processes behind their film exploring Óshlið, an abandoned road in Iceland - accompanied by a slideshow of their images from this changing place. ...
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Collage, sculpture and video artist Julien Masson collaborates with researchers in a dynamic dialogue between digital technology, science and arts to explore coccolithophores: tiny, photosynthetic marine lifeforms with an important role in our planet's oxygen and carbon cycles.    ...
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Fine artist Mary Eighteen and multimedia artist Julien Masson collaborate in painting and video, to explore the space between seduction and defilement in a world where meaning has broken down in relation to ecological protection of our oceans. ...
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Fine artist Mary Eighteen introduces her ongoing collection of works on a theme of the Sullied Atlantic and ocean acidification, exploring her deep concern for how humanity is destroying the future of our oceans and, in turn, ourselves. ...
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Gifts of Sound and Vision

Writer Mary Woodbury finds deep resonance in the music of Rising Appalachia, who draw on the rural landscapes of her family, and whose musical fusion offers ideas of resilience and community in the face of change and loss. ...
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For Gifts of Sound & Vision, Mark Goldthorpe chooses Earthrise -- a film about a moment a half-century ago that transformed our vision of the world and what might be possible in this short historic episode, modern human civilisation. ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe launches a series exploring film and audio that open a space to reflect on change -- choosing pieces on how human and non-human animals live, and how processes of time and tide shape our coasts ...
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In the Elements

Writer Philip Webb Gregg went looking for ways to let nature get to him, and found them on a bushcraft and survival course, with Extinction Rebellion on the streets of London, and in his garden in the city. ...
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Photographer Robynne Limoges shares a series of evocative abstract images that reflect her feelings on the critical issues of increasing water scarcity and expanding desert -- imagining 'the last bowl of water I will have at my disposal'. ...
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Photographer Robynne Limoges shares evocative images inspired by the haiku form, in her pursuit of the 'philosophical dilemma of how much light is required to dispel darkness and just how it is to be found and held close.' ...
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Writer Nick Hunt walked the invisible pathways of Europe’s named winds for Where the Wild Winds Are. His final extract tracks France’s Mistral ('masterly', from the Latin magistralis), the ‘idiot wind’ that inspired and tormented Vincent Van Gogh. ...
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Writer Nick Hunt walked the invisible pathways of Europe’s named winds for Where the Wild Winds Are. Here he pursues Switzerland's ‘snow-eating’ Foehn, which brings clear skies and wildfires -- as well as insomnia, nosebleeds, anxiety and depression. ...
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Writer Nick Hunt walked the invisible pathways of Europe’s named winds for Where the Wild Winds Are. In his third extract, Nick follows the freezing Bora –named for Boreas, the ice-bearded Greek god of the north wind.    ...
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Writer Nick Hunt walked the invisible pathways of Europe’s named winds for Where the Wild Winds Are. Here, he's on the trail of the Helm, which blows from desolate Cross Fell to wreak havoc in the Eden Valley. ...
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Writer Nick Hunt has walked the invisible pathways of Europe’s named winds, to discover how they affect landscapes, people and cultures through which they blow. Five extracts from Where the Wild Winds Are begin with the book's introduction. ...
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Preview

ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe explores the call for a creative symposium on 'how to love the postcarbon world', our new biosphere. Can art, creativity, imagination actually help us to break free of our seemingly unbreakable pattern of thought? ...
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Dramatist Julia Marques previews ClimateKeys, a visionary global initiative from fellow ClimateCultures Member Lola Perrin. Julia considers the space it offers for more relaxed, but still urgent, sharing of thought and dialogue on the predicament of our times. ...
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Review

ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe reviews the Deep Time Walk field kit's latest addition -- an attractive and engaging set of cards that explores our planet's 4.6 billion year timeline and offers us thoughtful paths into the living present. ...
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Filmmaker James Murray-White reviews A Film-Philosophy of Ecology and Enlightenment. In this scholarly work, Rupert Read advocates an ecological approach to film-philosophy analysis, arguing that film can re-shape the viewer’s relationship to the environment and other living beings. ...
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Mark Goldthorpe reviews Elizabeth Rush's Rising: Dispatches from the New American Shore: a contemplation of transience, connection and the possibilities of resilience, demonstrating the power of story to highlight opportunities to attend and adapt to a changing world.  ...
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Filmmaker James Murray-White reviews Robert Bringhurst and Jan Zwicky's Learning to Die: Wisdom in the age of climate crisis -- a book urging the cultivation of human virtues in a time of crisis and the rejection of lazy thinking.    ...
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Poet Nancy Campbell reviews Nick Drake's new collection, Out of Range: poems celebrating proximity and distance (spatial, temporal, emotional) to remark on the state we’re in, taking us on a journey through known worlds into unknown ones.    ...
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James Murray-White took a break from editing his Finding Blake film to review Cornerstones: subterranean writings. This new collection explores how all landscapes — from Dartmoor to the Arctic Circle — begin below the surface of the earth. ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe reviews Future Remains: A Cabinet of Curiosities for the Anthropocene. This book's objects offer a mirror test for our 'Age of Human' -- and conceptual links to A History of the Anthropocene in 50 Objects. ...
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Filmmaker James Murray-White describes taking part in the Small Earth conference within the stunning beauty of Snape. At this special event, psychotherapists, ecologists, economists, philosophical and spiritual thinkers gathered to address hope for future living within the ecosphere. ...
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Writer Sally Moss reviews Nancy Campbell's The Library of Ice: Readings from a Cold Climate. Rich in detail (microscope and dictionary, as much as library) its landscapes, eras, expeditions, personalities and planetary prognoses pile up like brash ice. ...
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Filmmaker James Murray-White reviews a recent event with GroundWork Gallery and the British Ecological Society: a gathering of poets, academics, and ecological minds exploring our responses to environmental crisis through a day of ecopoetics, provocations and wild conversations. ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe reviews Energetic: Exploring the past, present and future of energy, a book that weaves together different strands from the Stories of Change project, excursions into what energy means and work by the project's artists.    ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe reviews Jim Crace's imaginative 1988 novel, The Gift of Stones. Set on the cusp of change at the end of the Stone Age, a book could hardly be more relevant to the emerging Anthropocene.   ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe reviews Wide Sargasso Sea, the classic novel by Jean Rhys: her prequel to Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre, and a story of blurred, alienation, displacement, colonialism and the 'othering' of difference in race and gender. ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe reviews Annie Dillard's 1974 wonder-filled book, Pilgrim at Tinker Creek. A classic, it nonetheless resists easy classification and explores, in equal measure, horror and beauty in nature: fixing both with Dillard's hallmark unblinking stare. ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe reviews Geoffrey Household's outstanding 1939 thriller, Rogue Male: a brilliant piece of landscape writing and a novel of slowly revealed relationships, between individual and society; human and more-than-human; surface and subterranean; cunning and culture ...
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Filmmaker James Murray-White reviews Fire & Ice, an exhibition bringing together three artists who complement each others' practice in a way that points the audience 'to deeper connections with the base elements that underpin planetary life and consciousness'. ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe reviews Peter Shaffer's 1973 play, Equus, which explores incomprehensible violence against animals as an indictment of society's dulling of the feeling of true passion, our relationship with the natural world a distortion of nature. ...
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Filmmaker James Murray-White returns, fresh from a trip to Hull, City of Culture 2017, to bring us his review of the remarkable and immersive performance of 'FLOOD', a production that's "exploring our humanity and responses to the world". ...
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Writer Mark Goldthorpe reviews Anticipatory history, a book that explores the possibilities for 'looking back' at histories of environmental change in places to help us 'look forward' to what futures might be in store, and we might shape. ...
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Writer Mark Goldthorpe reviews the Deep Time Walk app, taking its blend of geology and biology on a walk into local woods, guided by its Fool and Scientist, to explore 4.6 billion years of Earth's history towards Now. ...
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Writer Mark Goldthorpe reviews Climate Symphony Lab. This lively and loud gathering of scientists, musicians, journalists, sound artists and social scientists was both fun and thought-provoking, and provided an overwhelm of data as raw material for creative thinking. ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe reviews William Golding's The Inheritors, an essential reimagining of a key transition for humanity, our place as inheritors of a world that lives around and inside us, and of separation of culture from nature. ...
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Writer Mark Goldthorpe reviews Into the Wind, a film excursion following naturalist, radio producer and writer Tim Dee as he walks off into the edgelands of East Anglia's Wash, in search of a pure unmediated, uninterrupted, thousand-mile wind. ...
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Mark Goldthorpe reviews John Gardner's Grendel, a novel that reimagines the monster of the Old English epic poem Beowulf and speaks to us about 'Othering' the natural world, and how our excluded monsters insist on coming back in. ...
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Writer Mark Goldthorpe joined the gathering for The Night Breathes Us In, part of Reading's year-long Festival of the Dark, and found three simple, unexpected ways that the ‘outside’ – human, more-than-human, solar – came inside the tent ...
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Signals from the Edge

Writer Brit Griffin lives in Cobalt, Canada -- a town that was born during the 1903 mineral rush. She shares a powerful account of signals to be detected in Cobalt's burning forests and the cry of a fox. ...
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ClimateCultures editor Mark Goldthorpe sets a new challenge: create small expressions of the more-than-human in the form of a signal for humanity. His inaugural signal appears as an alien encyclopedia entry cast adrift, backwards in time and space... ...
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Spaces

Artist Scarlet Hall reflects on defensiveness as an embodied response to being implicated in patterns of oppression. Using movement improvisation to decentre habitual narratives and open space to attend to relationships, Scarlet is seeking ecological perspectives on defensiveness. ...
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Dramatist Julia Marques reflects on her research for an MA in Climate Change: Culture, History, Society, and the role that theatre can play in opening up space for us to take in what climate change means for us.  ...
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Artist Mary Eighteen discusses powerful associations of hope she sees between the 20th-century art of Barnet Newman and a 21st-century technology that will protect Venice and its Renaissance heritage from some of the impacts of manmade climate change. ...
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Artist Jennifer Leach introduces Reading's year-long Festival of the Dark, whose purpose is to gently lead people into the darkness -- a place of stillness, mystery and contemplation, and a locus of the unknowing and the unknown. ...
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Mark Goldthorpe explores interstices -- a "space that intervenes between things, especially between closely spaced things; a gap or break in something generally continuous" -- and associations with birds that play off his fascination with two mythical ravens. ...
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Writer Laura Coleman explores the urgent need for spaces where we can engage the emotions of environmental change -- to hold onto our spaces, and create new ones -- and shares two spaces with deep meaning for her. ...
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Speculative Worlds

Author Mary Woodbury, who outlined some of the common ground that helps 'define' eco-fiction in Part 1, looks at how this super-genre has grown and diversified in recent years. Her story returns to a family trip to Ireland. ...
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Author Mary Woodbury opens a two-part series on the development of eco-fiction: a form with many roots, which is "not so much a genre as a way to intersect natural landscape, environmental issues, and wilderness into other genres." ...
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Author David Thorpe considers approaches that engage readers with human stories within the climate change one, and writers' responsibilities in climate fiction, given that "stories are fundamentally how humans understand and spread wisdom as well as entertain themselves." ...
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Writer David Thorpe overviews the development of fictional works addressing climate change, and how the term 'Cli-fi' (which he discovered when he published his novel, Stormteller) reveals the tension between our twin fascinations with utopian and dystopian visions. ...
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David Thorpe -- one of the short story writers, poets and non-fiction writers commissioned from two Weatherfronts climate change conferences -- explores the thinking that went into his story, included in the free anthology of the winning pieces. ...
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Multi-disciplinary artist Deborah Mason outlines her collaboration with researchers, engaging people in counter-factual imagination. What if one historic event had been otherwise, giving us an alternative present to ours? What would be the possibilities in our altered 'Now'? ...
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Spiritual Ecology

Illustrator and writer Mat Osmond explores shifting personifications of ‘animal mysteries’ in artist Meinrad Craighead's powerful paintings to look for an understanding of how we might approach art practice and our apprehension of landscape in terms of prayer. ...
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