A Personal History of the Anthropocene – Three Objects #3

This Members’ Post sees a welcome return by Jennifer Leach – fresh from another season of Reading’s year-long Festival of the Dark – with her excellent contribution to A History of the Anthropocene in 50 Objects. Jennifer’s selection of three objects evoking a past, a present and a future highlights care and nurture as constants across humanity’s ages and communities, and her words move from prose to poetry with an ease that makes for a timeline of hope.

Object from the past – the first blanket

German and Chinese scientists investigating
Photograph © German Archeological Institute, Mayke Wagner
http://www.dainst.org/projekt/-/project-display/56627

There was a moment in human history where a mother, for the first time, took a covering and swaddled another in it. It was most likely an animal skin she took. Possibly soft, possibly not. Was it her cold old mother she enveloped? Was it her partner? Her feverish friend? Was it her child? Whoever it was, I imagine her gesture as a premeditated act of love.

From the skins of animals, blankets evolved into softly woven fleece, product of careful husbandry and responsive learning. Into the weavings over the years were entwined responses to the living world – stories, tales, colour harnessed from familiar plants, symbols, references to greater powers, and patterns laid down in homage to those observed in nature.

People wrapped themselves in imagination and creativity, to create a reverent, consoling, protective sheath of comfort and respite, to shelter their love in the midst of harsh lives.

Object from the present – the Trangia

Trangia cooking set
Photograph: Trangia © 2017 / Image effects: Jennifer Leach © 2017
http://trangia.se/wp-content/uploads/2015/08/bild_startsida1-1000×700.jpg

Ah the Trangia! What a marvellous union of creative thinking and problem solving, streamlined with beauty, functionality and brilliant design into an artefact with near-perfect qualities. An entire packaged stove, including pots, that is roughly the size of one standard camp cooking pot. Simplicity within nature.

Each time I use it – and we have used the same one for decades – I thrill at its Russian Doll abundance. I remove the tie that binds it together, and off comes the lid, which doubles as a frying pan. Two pots nestle inside and within the smallest lies the grip handle and the screw-lid burner. The whole family is held within the vented base, which lifts the burner off the ground and provides airflow, and a windscreen protecting pot and flame, even in the gales. All fuelled by a humble little burner punching above its weight.

Our faithful stove has accompanied us on a cycling honeymoon, up mountains and in tents. We bought a second to cope with the culinary demands of a growing family. What we have not stewed, brewed or fried on them is not worth eating. My daughter’s first proudly presented meal was created on a Trangia – for the record, cooked pasta with a tin of sweetcorn and a tin of tuna.

When Trangia brought out a little lidded kettle, with its own handle, to fit snugly inside the inner saucepan, my joy and awe were complete. The sheer abundant genius of it!

Object from the future – prayer wheel generator

Tibetan prayer wheel
Original photograph: Xinhua/Lin Yiguang © 2017 / Image effects: Jennifer Leach © 2017
http://eng.tibet.cn/culture/tibetan_buddhism/1449128868492.shtml

It will not be turned

By car

Nor bus

Nor plane

Nor mule

Nor by low-paid workers

Nor some robotic tool

But by each of us

Whilst the children play

And the sick and the old

And the tired

Will shut their eyes

And move it with their prayer.

All it will require

Is that my foot follow yours

And your foot follow mine

And my hand lead yours

And yours lead mine

And with our power

Combined

We will generate

High voltage

Song lines

To illuminate

The land.

Find out more

You can read other contributions in the series at our page on A History of the Anthropocene in 50 Objects

Each post that appears in the series earns its author a copy of a book that had an impact on my thinking about our topics here – whether fiction, poetry or non-fiction – and which I’ve recently rediscovered in a charity shop. (Delivery in the UK only, sadly!) For her post, Jennifer receives a copy of Anticipatory History, edited by Caitlin DeSilvey, Simon Naylor and Colin Sackett. This short book of mini-essays from a cross-disciplinary research network explores “the roles that history and story-telling play in helping us to apprehend and respond to changing landscapes” and their wildlife.

Your personal Anthropocene? Space for creative thinking... 

 "What three objects illustrate a personal timeline for the Anthropocene for you? See the original 'guidelines' at ClimateCultures' A History of the Anthropocene in 50 Objects, and share your objects and associations in your own post." 

At its heart, the Anthropocene idea seems simple (if staggering): that as a species (but far from equally as generations, countries or communities) humankind has become such a profligate consumer, reprocessor and trasher of planetary resources that we've now left (and will continue to leave) our mark on the ecological, hydrological and geological systems that other species and generations will have to live within. In reality though, the Anthropocene is a complex and highly contested concept. ClimateCultures will explore some of the ideas, tensions and possibilities that it involves - including the ways the idea resonates with (and maybe troubles) us, personally. 

Your objects could be anything, from the mundane to the mystical, 'manmade', 'natural', 'hybrid', physical or digital, real or imaginary. What matters are the emotional significance each object has for you - whether positive, negative or a troubling mix of colours along that spectrum - and the story it suggests or hints at, again for you. Whether your three 'past', 'present' and 'future' objects are identifiably connected in some way or float in apparent isolation from each other is another open question. 

Use the Contact Form to let send your ideas, or if you're a Member contribute your objects for a future post.

 

Jennifer Leach
Jennifer is Director of Outrider Anthems, an arts company that seeks to change hearts and minds through creativity. She wrote and directed Song of Crow, premiered in Reading as part of the Reading Year of Culture 2016. Previous productions include Where Then Shall We Start? at the Queen's House, Royal Maritime Museum in 2014, and Take Two, premiered in Reading and Ascot in 2015 and undertaken as a commission. These works are concerned with issues of inhumanity - ecocide, warfare, and the injustices of Palestine.
Jennifer has also worked extensively as lead artist for the Royal Academy of Arts, Courtauld Institute, Somerset House, V&A Museum, and Contemporary Applied Arts, and was an arts advisor for Southern Arts.

See http://www.outrideranthems.com

Author: Jennifer Leach

Jennifer is Director of Outrider Anthems, an arts company that seeks to change hearts and minds through creativity. She wrote and directed Song of Crow, premiered in Reading as part of the Reading Year of Culture 2016. Previous productions include Where Then Shall We Start? at the Queen's House, Royal Maritime Museum in 2014, and Take Two, premiered in Reading and Ascot in 2015 and undertaken as a commission. These works are concerned with issues of inhumanity - ecocide, warfare, and the injustices of Palestine. Jennifer has also worked extensively as lead artist for the Royal Academy of Arts, Courtauld Institute, Somerset House, V&A Museum, and Contemporary Applied Arts, and was an arts advisor for Southern Arts. See http://www.outrideranthems.com

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